Lifetime advice

Blog post #477

The advice is simple. Living it is much harder.

You should remain invested in the stock market for the long-term, regardless of what is happening in the world, in a diversified manner, at a level that is consistent with your need, ability and willingness to take risk.

This means you should not get out of the stock market in a significant manner or go mostly to cash, no matter what is happening in the stock market, economy, politics or other factors.

This means that if you are in the accumulation phase, when you have money to invest and have a long-term time perspective, you should keep investing in stocks on a regular basis, irrespective of what else is going on. This is what we do.

In general, you should only change your stock allocation when your financial or life circumstances change. This means that your stock allocation will likely change as your wealth grows and as you get older, but not due to external factors.

Why are we writing this? Because regularly investing in the stock market and sticking to your stock allocation, through good and bad, is some of the most important advice we can convey to you as financial advisors.

Some people struggle with these concepts. They may get very nervous during a downturn and want to go to cash. Others are hesitant to invest in the stock market now or at other times because they think the market is “overvalued,” at a peak, or for some other reason (like a “potential” oncoming recession or the fear of higher future taxes).

We feel you need to have a guiding set of investment principles and stick to them. For our firm, remaining invested according to your long-term plan is one of these core principles.

But sometimes, should we make an exception to our own core principles?

Last year was one of those times when we challenged our long-held belief. When the pandemic began and started spreading outside of China during January and early February, I became increasingly concerned about Covid. I began questioning if this was a time to sell or reduce client stock allocations. As Covid started spreading in the US in late February 2020, Keith and I talked about this extensively, for hours, over many days.

Was the onset of Covid a reason to try to time the markets? After much consideration, we determined that there was no way that we could time the markets successfully, as you need to determine when to sell (February 2020) AND be able to determine when to buy back into the markets. We had no way to rationally figure out when to buy back into the market. We knew this downturn was different than most prior downturns, but we also knew that most prior major downturns seemed unexpected and unique at that time. We decided to adhere to our core philosophy and recommended that clients remain invested.

  • In hindsight, we made the correct decision by staying in the markets. Instead of selling in February/March 2020, we recommended that clients should gradually begin buying stocks after the markets had dropped significantly.

We knew from past financial history that markets generally rebound way before “the all-clear signal” is readily visible. Stock markets tend to be very forward thinking. By the time it eventually seems “safe” to get back into the markets, the markets have usually already advanced much higher from their bottom.

This is exactly what occurred in late March, which was the approximate bottom for the S&P 500. The stock market rebound began when lockdowns in the US were just starting and Covid had not even reached its worse impact, medically or economically. We made the proper decision not to temporarily get out of stocks due to the Covid pandemic, as US and global markets have strongly rebounded since March 2020, to higher levels few would have predicted a year ago.

To be a better investor, you should try to understand the following concepts:

  • No one is consistently able to accurately predict the future of the stock market. Market timing does not work.
  • The long-term path of the stock markets, US and globally, are upwards.
  • Declines in the stock market are temporary. The long-term historical path for the stock market since the 1920s has been upwards, with declines along the way that have been temporary. We do not see any change in that long-term pattern.
  • Peaks in the stock market are temporary, as they are exceeded by higher highs. This means that at some point in the future, the highs of today will be replaced by higher levels.

So you are prepared in advance, we want to remind you what normal declines are in the stock market when you own a broadly diversified portfolio.

  • It is normal for stock markets to decline at least 10% during almost every calendar year, from top to bottom, at least once during a year.
  • It is normal that stocks will drop a lot, like 20%-30%-40%, or more, every 3-5 years.

Addressing these issues of market timing and continuing to invest on a regular basis are some of the most important services that we can provide in our relationship with you.

  • If these are concerns or issues for you, we would be pleased to discuss this with you. We can listen to each other and work through your concerns, so we can determine an appropriate stock allocation for you and your family for the long-term. That stock allocation should enable you to have the ability to remain invested and learn to get more comfortable, so that your money can work for you and to help you reach your life and financial goals.

We want to work with you to develop a financial plan that includes an asset allocation to stocks that you can live with, when markets are rising and when they are dropping. That is how you can be a more successful long-term investor.

Talk to us.  We want to listen.  We want to assist you, your family members and friends.

 

Source:  *27 Principles Every Investor Should Know, by Steven J. Atkinson (Illustrations by Dan Roam) July 2019

Why do we……?

Blog post #476

While many of you have been clients for well over a decade, some of you are newer to WWM and our investment philosophy. We want to help you to have the best chance to reach your financial goals. We hope this post provides you with a summary of why we adhere to certain philosophies and practices.

Why do we use mutual funds and ETFs, rather than individual stocks?

To provide you with the best chance for financial success, we believe it is better to own diversified mutual funds (or ETFs, exchange traded funds, which are used interchangeably in this post), and not a portfolio of individual stocks. Investing in only a few companies is much riskier, in general, than investing in the markets as a whole. It is also difficult to pick which stocks will outperform the market over the long-term. We believe that it is very difficult to identify successfully, in advance and consistently over a long period of time, which individual stocks will outperform the markets.

We strongly believe that investors should be well diversified in many respects (by size of companies, by industry sector and geographically), which mutual funds and ETFs can provide. For most of our clients the core of your portfolio should be in mutual funds or ETFs, even if you want to invest in a handful of individual stocks as well.

Why do we use “passive” stock strategies and not “active” managers? And what about index funds?

There are huge amounts of academic and financial data that show money managers who “actively” try to pick and choose stocks to buy and sell generally underperform their asset class peers over short- and long-term periods of time. These “active” funds tend to be much more expensive, which is a hard hurdle to overcome. They trade more, which adds to expenses and causes more taxes, compared to a buy and hold approach. See these past blog posts, 10 Things You Should Know and 10 (or more) Things You Should Know, where we provide more details on how few active managers have been able to outperform their respective benchmarks.

Thus, when developing a strategy to strive for long-term financial success, we follow the data that “passive” money managers generally outperform “active” managers. It is very difficult to identify successfully, in advance and consistently over a long period of time, which money managers and mutual funds will outperform. Active managers may have some hot years of outperformance, but very few consistently outperform their peers or benchmarks over long time periods, such as 5 or 10 years or more.

The funds we utilize are similar to index funds but different. Index funds must track a specific index and they have little flexibility. A passive approach allows for the diversification and buy and hold benefits of indexing, with additional flexibility, such as not being strictly tied to an index. For example, if an index fund had owned Gamestop in the past few weeks, the index fund would not have been able to sell, as they need to hold the stocks in the index they track. A passive fund would have the flexibility to sell Gamestop, as they don’t have to strictly adhere to a specific index.

Why do we believe in utilizing so many different asset classes?

We make many of our investment decisions based on historical academic data and investment research, along with our own investment experience. We recognize that no one can accurately predict which type of stocks (asset classes) will outperform another asset class over the long-term.

To structure a portfolio to reach your goals, whether your goal is to grow your portfolio or to be able to feel secure and maintain your lifestyle, we apply these concepts. We want your portfolio to be very diversified, as that reduces individual stock risk. Being diversified does not eliminate the risk of investing in stocks, but it reduces the likelihood of incurring huge mistakes that are hard to overcome.

Financial research shows that the following applies, over varying long-term time periods, some back to 1926:**

  • Small stocks outperform large company stocks, both in the US and Internationally
  • Value stocks outperform growth stocks, both in the US and Internationally
  • International stocks and Emerging markets stocks (of undeveloped countries) have outperformed US Large Caps during many time periods.

We tilt most portfolios toward these factors, while remaining broadly diversified. While this data may be true over long-term periods, say over 10 years or more, it does not mean these trends (“factors”) will apply all the time or every year.

What this means to you is that we do not invest in only the S&P 500, as other asset classes have outperformed the S&P 500 over long periods of time. Financial research shows that a broadly diversified portfolio should do better over the long-term than owning just the S&P 500, so we do that.

Why do we believe in global diversification?

We recommend investing globally for the same reasons. Financial research shows that over the long-term, a broadly diversified portfolio, which includes US and International stocks, as well as large and small company stocks, with both value and growth, has outperformed owning just the S&P 500.

For example, from the period 2000 – 2010, a globally diversified portfolio would have far outperformed the S&P 500, as that index did poorly for those 10 years, while many other asset classes did quite well. In recent years, the opposite has been true, as the S&P 500 has outperformed International stocks. But as the world is constantly changing, no one can know what sectors or regions will do best over the next 5-10+ years.

Thus, we recommend some International exposure for most clients.

Talk to us.  We want to listen.  We want to assist you, your family members and friends.

 

 

** Source: DFA 2020 Matrix book, with data through 12/31/19, as well as other information.