Thinking about risk

Blog post #445

I never know where the ideas for these blog posts will come from. That can be a little risky, as I need to develop an idea every week.

Early Wednesday morning I was on a phone call with Delta, to cancel a flight for a trip we were supposed to be taking for a family event that was to occur this weekend.

I was fortunate that my call was answered quickly and a very nice Delta employee was able to process the cancellation, which we had been unable to do online or via their app. As she was processing the cancellation, the woman asked how me, and my business, were doing. I told her how bad I felt for her, Delta and the other Delta employees, as they didn’t do anything wrong to cause the crisis they are now facing.

Then I realized that many Delta employees at all levels (executives, pilots, phone representatives, etc.) are likely facing a huge double whammy problem right now that could have been avoided.

  • Many of them likely didn’t manage their risk properly. Many of them likely took on way too much single stock risk, by owning lots of Delta stock.
  • This could have been avoided with proper advice and planning. At the same time when many of them could lose their income due to Covid-related job losses (or have their incomes reduced, if they are able to keep their job), they have incurred huge losses in their Delta stock ownings, which has been crushed. Double whammy of loss!! Ouch!

This got me thinking about risk. 

Some risk can be avoided. Some risk can’t be prevented.

Some risk can be minimized. But risk is always there.

Your risk needs to be managed properly.

Dealing with risk is vital. Helping you to deal with financial and emotional risk is one of our main roles and can be of great value to you.

We often talk about diversification and its importance. The examples below are real world and should be evidence of why you should not own a huge amount of any one stock, and especially if it is your employer. We have seen unexpected issues arise in the past that severely impacted one company, or an industry, or now with Covid, are impacting many different industries.

Delta: Is now down 63% from its 2020 high and was down 72% at its 2020 low.

Marriott: Is now down 40% from its 2020 high and was down 69% at its 2020 low.

JP Morgan Chase: Is now down 40% from its 2020 high and was down 69% at its 2020 low.

These are Covid related losses, and likely would not have occurred if not for this crisis. But there are many examples of companies and industries that have suffered great losses for all kinds of reasons, due to technological changes, bad decisions, product failures (think of the Boeing Max), or lack of keeping up with societal trends. Think of GE, Boeing and many large retailers. Some have succeeded, others have not.

The energy sector has been hurt over many years, which worsened due to the Covid pandemic this year. There are many far worse examples than this, but Exxon Mobil is down 53% from where it was trading in 2016, dropping from $95 to around $45 now.

What are the lessons from this?

  • Be diversified. Do not own too much of one stock and definitely not too much of your employer’s stock. Our globally diversified portfolios eliminate the risk of a concentrated portfolio, by providing lots of diversification. Our clients are very well diversified, both in stock and fixed income holdings, in numerous, structured ways.
  • People don’t think single stock risk or the lack of diversification will actually impact them. But it happens. Remember Enron? Lehman Brothers? Some “unexpected event” could cause a huge financial crisis at almost company.
  • Reaching for yield is a significant risk. If a stock or bond is paying a dividend or interest rate that is far above market yields, then there is much greater risk involved.
    • We have seen people buy stocks for the “great” dividend yield and then something happens to the company….and the dividend is cut or even eliminated…and usually the stock price has dropped as well.
    • This is why we focus on your goals and your overall portfolio, not on dividend paying stocks or the yield of your stock portfolio.
  • Overconfidence and not expecting risk to show up. You always need to be prepared for unexpected events and risk to show up, as we have experienced with the Covid pandemic.
    • You need to be prepared emotionally for stock market declines of 10%-20% within every year.
    • You need to be prepared for occasional major declines in stocks of 30-50%, which could take several years to recover.
    • This is why we focus so much on your overall asset allocation, on the mix of stock and fixed income, based on your specific needs, risk tolerance and time frame…so you will be able to handle these types of declines.
  • With the current Covid crisis….there is still a significant amount of risk (and unknowns) that remain. 
    • While segments of the stock market have made major recoveries from the March lows, there are still many unknowns related to the pandemic.
    • Will there be future waves of Covid-19 that return in the fall or winter, or later? How will localized outbreaks impact manufacturing, food production and other aspects of our lives?
    • What will unemployment look like going forward? How quickly or slowly will those now unemployed return to jobs, and at what income levels?
    • When will an effective vaccine be released that is proven to be effective on a mass basis, in the US and globally?
    • What new programs will the US and other governments introduce to provide income and help people, companies, and state and local municipalities to help bridge the financial gap? What further actions will the Federal Reserve take, to continue to provide the financial markets and companies with support?
    • How quickly will people return to restaurants, stores, large events? How fast or slow will that be? Months? Years?
    • When will people return to traveling and tourism, both in the US and globally?
    • As these unknowns gradually get answered or resolved, risk and market volatility will likely remain high. No one can provide answers to these questions. The markets will react suddenly to good news, as well as to disappointments. You need to be prepared for both. 
  • Even the smartest make mistakes and even repeat them.
    • Warren Buffett has just repeated one of his biggest mistakes. He wrote in the 2007 Berkshire Hathaway shareholders letter about buying US Airways preferred stock in 1989. It quickly stopped paying the high dividend he was expecting. He eventually sold the stock at a gain in 1998, but he said that owning airlines was like a “bottomless pit.”
      • He wrote in the 2007 letter: “Now let’s move to the gruesome. The worst sort of business is one that grows rapidly, requires significant capital to engender the growth, and then earns little or no money. Think airlines. Here a durable competitive advantage has proven elusive ever since the days of the Wright Brothers.”
      • After swearing off airline stocks forever, he and his team started to load up on airline stocks in the fall of 2016, and by December 31, 2019, Berkshire Hathaway had invested more than $6 billion, owning close to 10% each of the top 4 US airlines. After the Covid crisis crushed the airlines stocks in March 2020, Buffett announced that they sold their airlines holdings during April 2020, at significant losses. He no longer thought the risk of owning the airlines was worthwhile. He never anticipated a pandemic type risk when he considered buying these stocks in 2016.

Risk of loss will show up again. What seems like unexpected risks, like 9/11 or the Covid pandemic, are always there, but we do not focus on them until they become known events. Other seemingly “unexpected” events will certainly happen again in the future. We just don’t know what the source of the major event, or risk, will be….and what its impact will be in the future. As none of us has a crystal ball or can predict the future, we as your advisors have a key role in helping you to manage your risk. And we take that responsibility very seriously.

We want to help you manage your risk, so that you and your family can reach your financial goals, whatever they may be, knowing that there are known and unknown risks that will impact you in the future.

If we are able to help you reach and maintain your financial goals and help you to effectively deal with all the risks that will show up along that journey, then we will consider our relationship a success.

We hope that you and your family are healthy, and enjoy this Memorial Day weekend with appreciation for your health, and the sacrifices of many who have come before us, so that we are able to live and enjoy the benefits of our country. Even during this pandemic, we have much to be thankful for.

As always, we are here for you, and family members or friends who could use our guidance and assistance during this crisis.

If you know of someone who may benefit from this blog regarding single or company stock risk, please forward this blog to them and let them know we are open to speaking with them.

 

 

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