Credit Card/Grocery Tips and Thoughts about Buffett

Blog post #443

Get more credit card benefits for grocery, restaurant and delivery purchases

As we are all buying or ordering more groceries, as well as using delivery services due to the pandemic, a number of premium credit cards have significantly increased their rewards for grocery purchases and food delivery services, either from grocery stores or restaurants.

Chase and American Express recently announced that for many of their premium credit cards, they will be offering up to 5X points or cash, on grocery store purchases. For some credit cards, this now includes grocery delivery services like Instacart.

Each credit card may have different benefits, and differing time frames (some through May 31, some until July 31), so you should check on each credit card’s specific benefits.

This may not be huge money, but if you can get 5% back, rather than 1%, that can make a difference to you and your family.

Other related items:

  • Some Chase credit cards are offering rewards for restaurant delivery services, like Door Dash. If you have these cards, take a look at their rewards or search for this on the Internet.
  • If you have normally charged all your purchases to accumulate airline or hotel points, you may want to consider using other credit cards that offer cash or points that are redeemable in other ways, especially if you already have lots of airline and hotel points, and don’t plan to travel in the near future (though we certainly hope that travel can resume sooner rather than later).
  • Instacart has become a popular grocery delivery service.  After using Instacart, I was very surprised with a recent purchase from a local grocery store (which is not a chain). While we thought this was a great service, there was a 12% mark-up on the food, plus a delivery fee, service fee, and we paid a tip as well.
    • In later reviewing the grocery store’s website, I learned that purchases through Instacart were marked up 12% (and ours was actually more), in addition to the other fees. Each grocery store’s relationship with Instacart is likely different.
    • While grocery delivery services are important these days, you should be aware of this cost, as it can be significant. We are more likely to pick up groceries that the store can pack, which will still be safe, and save a lot of money.

Thoughts on Warren Buffett’s virtual Shareholder meeting

This Saturday afternoon, Warren Buffett spent a few hours on a virtual live stream for Berkshire Hathaway’s annual meeting, providing a financial history of the US and the stock market, as well as discussing how Berkshire Hathaway and his team have handled the pandemic.

He announced that they sold all their airline stocks in late March and April, at significant losses. They had accumulated up to 10% stakes in the 4 largest US airlines in past years (Delta, Southwest Airlines, United Continental and American). He said, “the airline business has changed in a major way and the future of airlines is much less clear.” He said he made a mistake in buying them, as he believed the airline earnings would continue to increase, but that has changed now due to the pandemic.

The other major news was that Berkshire has not made any large stock purchases or deals in 2020.  This is quite different than in the financial crisis, when Berkshire made major investments or provided financing to many companies, including Goldman Sachs, Bank of American and others.

Buffett discussed the current situation as still having many unknowns, but the variance in possible outcomes is less than it was in March. He gave huge credit to Fed Chair Powell and the committee for their swift actions in March, 2020, and implied that the financial markets and the economy would be far worse now without their many programs and steps.

Our observations about Buffett/Berkshire’s actions and non-actions:

Buffet/Berkshire’s decision to sell all their airlines stock holdings, at or near a market bottom, could be viewed as startling or surprising, as he generally holds for the very long term. Buffett stressed in his comments that the sales should not be interpreted as his view on the overall stock market, only in relation to the airline sector.

Buffett is decisive, which is commendable. He acts quickly, when he buys, sells or makes transactional decisions. He is also confident enough in himself that he can admit a mistake and walk away from a loss.

This is just my assumption, but he must have thought that the other Berkshire companies would earn more with the proceeds from the airline stock sales than had he left the money in airline stocks. Or he thinks the airline stocks will decline much further or not recover for many years.

This is something to consider, as does he think that it will take many years for the airlines, and thus, hotels, travel and other leisure companies to get back to “normal,” or pre-pandemic earnings levels? This would be one of the many unknowns he referred to indirectly throughout the introduction and during his Q & A.

That Berkshire has not made any major stock purchases or provided financing to major corporations as they did in the Great Financial Crisis, or at other times in the past, is indicative of several factors, but should not be overly concerning to individuals as long-term investors.

  • Interest rates are very low and the Federal Reserve has taken strong action that has allowed large corporations to borrow huge sums in the credit markets recently (billions), which many were unable to do in 2008-09.
    • For example, Boeing is facing a severe cash crunch, due to their Max plane problems, and now the lack of demand for planes, due to Covid 19.
    • Last Thursday, Boeing borrowed $25 billion in one of the largest bond offerings ever. There were many different maturities, but the 10-year maturity paid 5.15%, or 4.50% more than the 10-year US Treasury bond. Boeing is rated just above junk status, as a very low-grade investment quality company, right now.
    • But instead of having to go to Buffett, and pay say 10-12%, which he may have been willing to entertain, other institutional investors (likely bond mutual funds, insurance companies, etc.) were more than eager to buy these Boeing bonds. As Buffett is not going to loan money to risky companies at 4-5-6% interest, he has not made these types of deals right now.
      • Just like we are not going to buy these Boeing bonds as investments for our individual clients. We would agree with Buffett that the risk is much greater than the reward. We are fine to pass on these.
  • Similarly, as the stock market dropped a lot very quickly and then has made a significant recovery, Buffett/Berkshire did not jump into the stock market to make any major purchases.
    • His view as a very patient, generally long-term investor has not changed. He wants to buy when he feels he is getting a bargain, or he perceives value. He views taking no action is an action.
    • Berkshire likely has more than $200 Billion already in many individual stocks. The top 5 holdings from 12/31/19 were Apple, Bank of America, Coke, American Express, and Wells Fargo. His holdings in these and other financial stocks have dropped significantly, due to less credit card usage, as well as increased default risk, if the pandemic crisis worsens or continues longer than expected, and there is not further governmental financial support. But he has not sold any of these major holdings, or anything else.
      • While Buffett clearly did not pound the table Saturday and say stocks are under-valued, he remains optimistic about the long-term prospects for stocks.
        • He provided clear caveats, and important reminders for stock investors, that stocks may not always perform well and there may be long periods without a recovery.
        • He said to be an investor in stocks, you must be prepared for significant declines, sometimes as much as 50%.
        • Buffett: “I don’t believe anybody knows what markets are going to do tomorrow, next week, next month or next year. Anything can happen. You need to be careful about how you bet simply because markets can do anything (in the short-term). Nobody knows what’s going to happen tomorrow.”
        • Buffett: “Equities (stocks) will outperform US Treasuries over the long term.”

Berkshire Hathaway and Warren Buffett are very different than you, our clients, and how we manage your portfolio. We feel it is important to listen and learn from Buffett and his team.

However, we are managing your portfolio so that you can meet your goals, and those of your family. Buffett is managing Berkshire Hathaway as a public company with a multi-generational mindset, and for stockholders, not to meet your personal spending and savings needs.

We share Buffett’s concerns and the many unknowns about the future. We have often stated that the future is unknown, because it is, but there are even more unknowns now than normal.

We are confident that we have structured your portfolio to be able to handle the unknowns of the future, by providing you with an appropriate amount of conservative fixed income “Foundation,” based on your personal circumstances. 

We remain confident long-term investors, for ourselves and for you.

As always, we are here for you, and family members or friends who could use our guidance and assistance during this crisis.

 

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