The New World-Part 2

Blog post #437

As I write this Wednesday evening and early Thursday, global stock markets have had 2 very good days in row, and Thursday is starting out well.

I want to be positive and optimistic, as that is my nature, but I think we are far from out of the woods yet. The patient (unfortunately, far too many real patients, as well as the US and global economies) are still on life support.

Just to be clear….my first concern is for everyone’s health. But as a financial advisor, and not a scientist or medical professional, these thoughts are only about the financial implication of the crisis we are now in. All of us.

The strong stock market this week was due to the positive news that the US Congress and President are “close” to reaching an agreement on the largest fiscal stimulus / bridge loan / corporate financing package in the history of the world. They have been close to getting this done for days, but as of my writing, the Senate, but not the House, has passed the legislation and the President still has not signed it.

Note to clients….when the final legislation is enacted, we will send out an update. Our back- office firm’s national Direction of Education (tax and financial planning expert) sent out 56 tweet thread late last night….we are on this!)

This legislation is vital and necessary, along with the strong action and quick responsiveness by the Federal Reserve to keep the financial markets flowing well, especially the corporate and municipal bond markets.

Ever heard the saying “progress not perfection?” This is the case. The legislation and Federal Reserve actions are to save the US economy and to try avoiding an economic calamity….not all the details matter…preventing an economic catastrophe during or after the health crisis is what matters. These programs are intended to provide various forms of liquidity, or bridge loans/financing, so as many people and businesses can remain afloat through the health crisis.

Without these actions and programs, companies large and small, as well as individuals and small businesses, could face horrible liquidity and financial problems.

Let’s be realistic. This may not be the bottom for the stock market. We just don’t know.

  • Historical financial data teaches us that when markets begin to be very volatile, they tend stay volatile for a while.
  • This is important information that you need to understand, internalize and get used to. 

With this much uncertainty….and there is a lot of it, markets will likely continue to be very volatile for a while. We have planned for this. We are acting accordingly, on your behalf. You need to continue to be mentally prepared for the possibility of worse health and financial news, and stock market declines, especially if the health news worsens or does not get better within the next month or so.

This is just a guess, but I don’t think this will be the final major legislation that will be necessary before this crisis is over. There were many programs and legislative acts during the 2008-09 crisis. This legislation and Federal Reserve liquidity steps are already way larger than all the 2008-09 actions, by multiple times (per CNBC this morning). The markets were wanting good news this week and traded higher on it. That’s how markets function. Financial markets react quickly to news, good or bad, as we have clearly seen in recent weeks.

We just want you to be realistic and prepared for either outcome, good or bad. And this is the basis of our investment strategy right now.

  • We can’t predict the timing of any of this, which is why we are recommending to gradually rebalance, to gradually buy stocks at these levels.
  • We know it makes sense to follow the discipline of buying low and selling high… and we will continue to do that, but with caution, for most clients.

What the world is experiencing is far from normal. It has affected our everyday lives in many ways. Companies and health professionals are innovating. Ford will be producing ventilators. I read last night that anesthesiology machines may be able to be converted to ventilators with a simple change in parts, which could provide tens of thousands of ventilators very quickly. Solutions will be found. Hopefully those with knowledge and expertise in many areas (medicine, leadership, technology, supply chain, manufacturing, etc.) will adapt, be creative and resilient.

But in terms of the stock market, this is normal. Yes, fortunately and unfortunately.

  • Stock markets annually go down temporarily (peak to bottom) on average about (14%) most years.
  • And one in every 5 years or so, stocks temporarily go down much more, sometimes 20% – 30%, or way more, which is called a “bear market.”

Since the end of World War II, in 1945, there have been 16 bear markets in the S&P 500, which I am defining for this purpose as declines of around 20% or more (there were a few that were almost 20%, so I’m counting those…a temporary loss of 19.5% feels almost like a temporary loss of 20%, right?).

That is an average of 1 bear market every 4.7 years, which is around the long-term average.

But this is the key…and thank you for those of you who are still reading…

The bottom point of the S&P 500 at the end of some recent bear markets….

Do you see the clear long-term trend? The losses are temporary on the long upward trend of our society. Stocks have far outperformed cash, or other types of fixed income, over the long term. Stocks have provided more than 7% annually over the long-term inflation rate.

With rewards, comes risk. Keep the faith. Buckle in for more volatility. And stay healthy and  safe!!

As always, we are here for you, and family members or friends who could use our guidance and assistance during this crisis.

 

 

Note: The S & P 500 Index is an index of companies, of which the companies in the Index has changed dramatically over the years. It is composed of 500 of the largest publicly held companies in the US. Our firm believes in global diversification as well as holding small and medium sized companies, both in the US and Internationally. Using the S & P 500 Index is for educational and illustrative purposes, and the trends explained above are generally representative of global stocks.
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