Three Cuts and They’re Out-For Now

Blog post #418

The US Federal Reserve cut short term interest rates on Wednesday, for the third time since July, 2019. They signaled that this is likely to be the last reduction for now, unless the economy slows sharply.

“The current stance of (interest rate) policy is likely to remain appropriate” as long as the economy expands moderately and the labor market remains strong, said Fed Chairman Jerome Powell in a press conference after the Fed’s two day meeting.*

This rate cut reduces the federal funds range by .25%, to a range between 1.50%-1.75%. This impacts short term interest rates, but long term interest rates have also declined in 2019.

Analysts interpreted the Fed’s statement and press conference answers to indicate that the bar has been raised for the next increase or decrease, meaning it is likely that short term rates will remain at these levels for a number of quarters into the future.

Major change since last year

These actions are in sharp contrast to the Fed’s actions in 2018, when they raised short term interest rates 4 times, and had expectations for further increases well into 2019 and 2020.

A year ago, the Fed funds range was 2-2.25% and were expected to be in range of 2.75%-3.25% by the end of 2019, as our blog post dated November 8, 2018 discussed.

Due to weakening global growth, continued trade-policy uncertainty and muted inflation, the Fed felt it was necessary to cut rates during 2019. Current short term interest rates are 1%-1.5% less than the Federal Reserve expected at this time last year. This shows how difficult it is to predict the direction of interest rates and financial markets.

Longer term interest rates have also dropped significantly over the past year. The 10 year US Treasury Note yield was 3.214% at the end of October, 2018 (last year). Today, that rate is 1.70%, a drop of more than 1.5%. This has had the impact of reducing mortgage rates and other borrowing costs during the past year.

How is the economy doing?

We remain positive about the economy and growth in the US. Throughout 2019, many analysts and financial commentators have expressed recession concerns in the US and globally. There is still no sign of that occurring now.

Economic data continues to show that companies and US consumers are doing well. US GDP, an indication of economic growth, grew at an annual rate of 1.9% in the last quarter. This was stronger than economists expected, but less than than the growth in the prior quarter of 2.0%. Business spending did decline, but consumer spending remains strong, as does housing and unemployment remains at 50 year lows.**

Corporate earnings continue to beat analysts expectations. While overall earnings for the S&P 500 are on track to decline for the 3rd straight quarter, about 75% of the 342 companies that have reported earnings as of the morning of October 30th have beaten Wall Street expectations. The energy sector accounts for most of the reason for the decline in corporate profits, and along with utilities, have the most earnings misses.***

Based on this information, if the energy sector was excluded, it appears that corporate profits continue to grow. The growth in corporate earnings, and their future expectations, is what causes stock prices to increase in the long run. Earnings are expected to grow 5.7% and 7.1%, respectively, in the first and second quarters of 2020.***

The Fed has acted to prevent or minimize the risk of a recession. The US consumer is feeling good, secure about their job prospects and continues to spend. Corporate earnings remain solid. These are some of the reasons why we continue to remain positive for the long term.

We hope you find this analysis to be timely, helpful and provides you with clarity and information that is understandable.

We want you to focus on your long term financial goals, not on short term moves in interest rates or stocks. However, this type of information can be helpful in keeping you on track and sticking with the financial plan that we have developed for you.

Sources:

* “Fed Cuts Rates, Signals a Pause,” Wall Street Journal, October 31, 2019, page 1

** “Consumer Spending Bolsters Growth,” Wall Street Journal, October 31, 2019, page 2

*** “Better-Than-Expected Earnings Ease Growth Fears -for Now,” WSJ.com, October 31, 2019

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