Major Financial Plot Twist

Blog post #386

In December and the fall of 2018, the Federal Reserve played the role of villain.

They had raised short term interest raises for five consecutive quarters and were projecting more increases for 2019 and 2020.

As a result of these increases, the Federal Reserve appeared to be Grinch-like just prior to last Christmas, which contributed to significant stock market losses in 2018. See our blog post, Is the Fed acting like Grinch?, from December, 2018. 

But in January, the Federal Reserve began changing the plot in this economic story. They went from villain to hero, at least as far as global stock markets and investors are concerned. 

Since their late December meeting, Federal Reserve officials have signaled in speeches and meetings that further rate increases may not be needed in the near term. 

This change in the Fed’s stance, though caused by their concern that US and global economies are slowing in growth, are a large factor in the strong performance of major US and global stock indices so far in 2019.

To reap the long-term benefits of investing in a globally diversified stock market portfolio requires patience and discipline. If you were patient and disciplined in late 2018, and didn’t overreact to the 2018 stock market declines, you have likely been rewarded in 2019.

The Federal Reserve announced no new short-term interest rate changes this week and projects no increases for the remainder of 2019, after their recent two day meeting. The average member now expects a single .25% increase next year, in 2020, and no increases for 2021. 

This is a major change from their position in December, 2018, when Board members forecasted two .25% rate increases in 2019, which was a reduction from their projections earlier in 2018 for three 2019 increases.

The Fed reaffirmed its stance that it “will be patient” in determining future interest rate changes, based on observed economic data (past economic activity) and expected future conditions.

It is clear once again that economists are not able to accurately predict the future.The Fed is supposed to have some of the top economic experts in the country, yet their “dot plot” forecasts of future interest rate expectations have consistently been inaccurate over past years. 

How will the economy act in the future? Will the Fed play the role of villain or hero?

We know that the future story will likely not play out as currently forecasted. There will be events and changes that can’t be anticipated. No one really knows the economic future, how the trade issues will be resolved or the pace of growth. It is likely that the Fed’s current dot plot forecasts of future short term interest rate changes will be different than they predicted this week. We don’t know when or if they will raise or even reduce rates, or the pace of the actual future changes…from what they predict now. 

This reaffirms our philosophy of not investing based on interest rate predictions. This is why we believe in using laddered fixed income holdings, spread across various maturities, and not betting on interest rate moves. This is why we don’t make stock market investments and recommendations based on predictions. 

Fed Chair Jerome Powell still expects the US economy to “grow at a solid pace” in 2019, but at a slower pace than in 2018. This is causing longer term interest rates, such as the 10 year bond, to decline even further than expected. The rate was over 3.24% in early November, 2.77% in late December, 2018 and was 2.54% Wednesday afternoon, which was the lowest level since January, 2018.

We always stress that investors need to be focused on the long-term. Commenting about these Federal Reserve changes may appear that we are focusing on the short term. However, we feel that it is important to share our thoughts and analysis about current market news and actions.

You want investment and financial advice. You want reassurance and confidence, with a future that is uncertain.

We can provide you with clarity, perspective and solid answers. 

We can guide you through financial complexity and work toward increasing your changes of meeting your financial and retirement goals. 

Talk to us.

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