Is the Fed acting like Grinch?

The Federal Reserve on Wednesday again increased short term interest rates by .25%, which is the fourth such increase of 2018.

This move was widely anticipated (and telegraphed by the Fed) for weeks, but recent financial circumstances made the action surprising to many analysts.

We always stress that investors need to be focused on the long-term. At times, writing this blog weekly feels like we are focusing on the short term. However, we feel that it is important to share our thoughts and analysis about current market news and actions.

So while we want to wish you Happy Holidays, Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year….the financial markets are not filling investors stockings with good cheer.

Global stock markets have declined dramatically during the fourth quarter, affecting nearly all asset classes, in varying amounts.

The price of oil has dropped over 35% since early October, due to concerns of slowing economic activity and supply increases, particularly in the US.

What do we think? Does the Fed action make sense? What happens from here?

We have often explained that the Federal Reserve has a dual mandate, to encourage full employment and price stability, which means to maintain inflation around 2%.

Unemployment in the US is at all-time lows and inflation is at or below 2%, and not likely to increase soon given the large decrease in oil prices. Based on the current data, it may be hard to understand why the Fed increased short term interest rates on Wednesday.

The US stock market reacted negatively after the Fed’s written announcement and press conference, as the Chair explained that Board members still predict two .25% rate increases in 2019. However, those are predictions and they are subject to change, based on future economic conditions. The currently projected two increases for 2019 is reduced from their internal projections earlier this year for three 2019 increases.

The Fed acts independently and we hope that their actions do not cause the economy to slow too much. The Fed is supposed to focus on their dual directives, and not react to the stock market or political pressures, which they are clearly not doing. Maybe the Fed sees the US economy as stronger than the stock market is fearing. The stock market can be very volatile and investor psychology can change quite quickly, as it has a number of times during 2018.

Short and longer term interest rates have nearly come together, as of Wednesday afternoon. This is called a flat yield curve. The 2-year US Treasury note yield is 2.68%, while the 10 year US Treasury yield is now 2.77%, declining from 3.24% as recently as November 8th.

The implications of these interest rate moves is that longer term borrowing is now cheaper than it was a month ago, which should be better for the housing and vehicle sectors, than 4-6 weeks ago.

In November, the stock market declined in response to the sharp rise in the 10-year yield to above 3.2%, but the stock market has not rebounded as longer term interest rates have dropped, due to slowing economic growth concerns.

We do not know what the stock market will do in the near future. We know that enduring losses is not easy. We wish we had a crystal ball, but we don’t.

We don’t know exactly what someone like Warren Buffett is doing right now. However, based on his past actions and speeches, we would assume that he and Berkshire Hathaway would be buyers, not sellers. He has often said it is wise to be “fearful when others are greedy and greedy when others are fearful.” In other words, when others are fearful and stock prices have dropped, it may represent a good time to buy, or at least, not a time to sell.

We feel that to reap the long-term benefits of investing in a globally diversified stock market portfolio requires patience and discipline. This is one of those times, where patience and discipline are encouraged. We feel that in the long term you will be rewarded.

We are here for you, if you want to talk to us, to review your portfolio or discuss your concerns.

Happy Holidays!

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