A Tribute to a Special Person

Art Sweet, who was one of the nicest people I have had the privilege of knowing and working with, died last week at the age of 93. We worked together as partners at a prior CPA firm for 18 years, from 1990 until 2008. 

Art had merged his two person CPA and bookkeeping practice into this other CPA firm a number of years before I joined that firm in 1990. Originally, Art intended to gradually transition his clients and retire a few years later. Art exceeded the firm’s “mandatory” retirement age of 65 or 70 by quite a bit, as he continued working until last December….finally retiring at age 93.

I really mean it when I say I had the privilege of working with Art. At a funeral or when someone dies, you sometimes hear people say that everyone liked him or her, or they never heard a bad word about that person. Art Sweet was truly one of these people. He was kind. He was liked by everyone he came in contact with. Although I’m sure he had his private moments, I cannot remember him ever getting angry or raising his voice at anyone.

Art and his wife Gladys, when they were both younger and healthy, were world travelers. They loved music and dancing, as well as their many friends and family. We would frequently drive to one of his favorite lunch places, the former Georgio’s on Greenfield Road, always splitting a Caesar salad and huge bowl of pasta. We would have great conversations about his travels, his last trip or the one he was planning, as well as all types of cultural activities, such as a concert he attended, a movie he had seen or a book he was reading. I felt like I was living vicariously through him. Now, I am able to do some of the things we had talked about at those lunches.

Decades ago, I was in awe of Art for his ability to adapt to all the technology changes he encountered. He started as an accountant and CPA way before personal computers. He did tax returns by hand in pencil. He learned how to use computers, as well as handle the continuous avalanche of tax changes that a CPA faces. It is one thing for someone in their 30s or 40s to learn new technology, but imagine the challenges he faced and overcame to keep current with technology in his 70s, 80s and even in his 90s.

People leave a legacy. Art left me a huge legacy. Many years ago, I read a concept by a consultant, Alan Weiss, that when you look back on your career or firm, you will find that it is very likely that a handful of key people will have had a huge impact on your business.

I am very fortunate that Art had many wonderful clients, as many of Art’s clients transitioned through the years at the CPA firm to become my clients. As I transitioned from a full-time CPA to a financial advisor, many of these clients, and their families, became clients of our financial advisory firm, and are still valued clients and cherished friends.

Art had a love of life and a passion for culture and travel. Art cherished his family, his children, grandchildren and numerous great-grandchildren. For many years, he cared for his wife as she had Alzheimer’s.

Arthur M. Sweet was a special person. The world lost a very kind and gentle person last week.

I am grateful that he was a part of my life.

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